Printmaking

COLLOGRAPHS

A process that creates a block from the layering and glueing of natural and found materials, plants, tapes, cut paper & peeling away layers of illustration board to base of wood, card, or plexiglass.  The plate is inked into the intaglio recesses.  An etching press with blankets is used to push the damp paper into the recesses of the plate to remove the ink. The printed result can also retain embossing of the image into the paper as it is rolled through the press.

CYANOTYPE

Paper is coated with a light-sensitive photo emulsion.  Objects are placed over the paper and is exposed to a UV light or sunlight.  After a timed exposure the emulsion is washed off & dried, revealing an ethereal cyan blue image. Paper is coated with a light-sensitive photo emulsion.  Objects are placed over the paper and is exposed to a UV light or sunlight.  After a timed exposure the emulsion is washed off and dried, revealing an ethereal cyan blue image.

MONOTYPE/MONOPRINT

A monotype is a single impression made from a  printing surface that cannot be reused
except as a “ghost” image.  This is a second print from the SAME impression.  Monotypes
& monoprints are unique prints and are not printable in an edition.  The marks made and
the immediacy of approach are more closely associated with painting.  Monoprints combine
monotype with other printmaking processes and mixed media monotypes.  This can involve
the introduction of intaglio, drypoint & engraving elements.  These are still singular or “unique” prints and not  printable editions.

MEZZOTINT/ETCHING/DRYPOINT

The etched line differs from the engraved line primarily because of the use of acid.
An engraved line is characterized by its smooth, crisp appearance, an etched line bears
witness to the bite of the acid & possesses a slight irregularity.  Aquatint utilizes resin powder to produce a tonal, textured surface.  Drypoint is the use of a needle forced across a plate creating a burr.  It is these flecks of metal that hold the ink.  The characteristic of a drypoint is a softer, more furry line in comparison to the controlled clarity of the engraved line.

The mezzotint technique involves the use of a tool to uniformly roughen the entire
plate with a rocker.  The aim is to ensure that enough ink is held to impart a consistent
layer of black ink onto the paper.  Scrapers are then used to introduce gray areas working
delicate transitions of tone up to pure white using burnishers.  A total tonality can be achieved from black to white.

WOODCUTS AND LINOCUTS

Relief prints are traditionally created using a block of wood.  The areas that have been
cut away exist below the surface of the block and will not print, as the ink remains on the raised surface.  Once the block has been inked, paper is placed on the surface of the block and is run through a printing press or the image is transferred using a baren.

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